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Rest in Peace.

January 30, 2010

One of my college roommates from Yavapai JC passed away the other day and I just found out. I wanted to pass along my families sympathy and prayers to Terri Kellen and family. Her husband Terry was a roommate of mine in what is to this day is still one of the funnest and best years of my life.

Terry and Terri were married the day they met, they just didn’t know it! They were made for each other. TBone, as he was known in the room and around the school, was the nicest, kindest, gentlest soul you’d ever want to know, and he’ll be greatly missed. An infectious laugh as well as being the proverbial “Big teddy Bear”, Terry was someone everybody liked and someone you always enjoyed your time with. From Lynx lake parties to courtyard wiffle ball he was in on it all. Shooting pool at the bar and the late night Jack in the Crack runs, I can remember it all like it was yesterday.

Never wanted to get to this stage in life, when people you grew up with and cared about start leaving.

God Bless and our prayers are with the Kellen family.

4 Comments leave one →
  1. Mike Reardon permalink
    January 30, 2010 11:27 am

    My condolences to the family as well and to you on the loss of a friend.
    I lost my uncle, Walter Dorr, to ALS a while back and you were a source of support and comfort to my aunt and my cousins. Thank you for your work with the ALS Association. You are one of the good guys.

  2. Juch an Jehwy permalink
    January 31, 2010 1:30 am

    Scott Brown, baby!!Schilling wins again!!!! in a word: YES!!

    I mean, surely there’s no stories like that one that couldve been prolonged with affordable healthcare, right?

    SCOOT BROWN!! OBAMA SUCKS!!!

  3. wolfpack3 permalink
    February 1, 2010 10:42 pm

    Thank you so much for writing this. Terry, TK or Teek as we called him, was my assistant baseball coach for our high school in Arizona. He is the nicest man i have ever met in my life. TK always had positive things to say, even if his day was rough, he would walk out onto our field with that big smile on his face. He really pushed everyone on the field to be a better person on and off the field.

    He was like a friend to me, not just a coach. If i saw him in the hallways, he would never hesitate to strike up a conversation with me about baseball, or about my hitting. He was always willing to help out no matter what.

    The day after he passed, all of the baseball players, myself included, got together just to talk about our favorite moments with him and the mood went from somber to jovial when we remembered his jokes that he used to tell. He was such a positive influence to everyone at our school. Even though he was not my assigned counselor, i could go to him with any class problems, and he would gladly help me change a class if i needed to. He not only helped the baseball players, but he would help out anyone that he could. TK brightened everyones day with his personality, and especially that smile. Alumni would constantly come back to the field, because they knew they would find him there, just to have a conversation with him.

    Even now i can remember his smile, and his electric personality. The players this year have all written TK 22 on their cleats, and even some on their jerseys just to keep him in rememberence.

    I am so glad that i received the chance to know him and be coached by him because he really was a great man. Glad to see that you also got to be with him and experience the way he was.

  4. donroh permalink
    February 19, 2010 8:37 pm

    Yea, that was a damn shame, too young. RIP T-bone…

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