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Thanks

February 9, 2009

He sure as hell wasn’t apologizing my way, or even considering my opinion, but I sincerely appreciate that Alex, unlike so many others, stood up and held himself accountable for his actions.

It doesn’t make him any less guilty, any less accountable or any less of a Yankee (subtle Yankee jab) but it’s refreshing as hell to see someone say “I f’d up, I made a mistake and I’ll have to deal with it”. He’s fricking human, he made a horrible choice and he’ll have to deal with it.

Do whatever you want, speculate on whatever you want but the guy ‘manned up’, admitted his mistake, that’s enough for me. Nothing we can do about it at this point but move on as fans and players.

I still believe the names of all the positives should be released. That the media chose to only ‘out’ him is a crime in and of itself.

I also believe someone, or many someone’s at the MLBPA should be fired , right now, today, for failure to follow the protocols and procedures outlined in the testing agreement. Same for the MLB offices.

And if it is true, and someone or more than someone at the MLBPA was giving advance notice to players of testing, that in and of itself should cost them their jobs.

This whole situation stinks to high heaven but it’s completely wrong that one guy is being held out there for everyone to pencil whip, flat out wrong.

110 Comments leave one →
  1. Matt F. permalink
    February 9, 2009 2:59 pm

    Didn’t you play for the 1993 Phillies? Why don’t you come clean about them and then point fingers at everyone else? I’m a Phillies fan and saying that!

  2. February 9, 2009 2:59 pm

    Agreed. He made a terrible decision earlier this decade, but today made a great decision to not deny anything and come clean. Some of these other guys should do the same.

  3. February 9, 2009 2:59 pm

    Give him points for admitting what was brought to light but in general I find that this man is a no class act despite his now questionable achievements.

  4. michael cozzolino permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:01 pm

    If he is truly sorry ,he should start over with every single offensive stat.

  5. derek permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:03 pm

    if 104 tested positive, how many overall tests were done? I want to know the percentage here. Everyone was saying 10% or less and I believe Canseco and the # was probably 80%. I played college in 1987-1991 and EVERYONE WAS ON STERIODS. The pressure from upperclassmen was enormous and it was the culture. I really want the percentage here!

  6. Jason in Dallas permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:04 pm

    100% right

  7. Ed Guerrero permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:06 pm

    ALL of the names need to be released RIGHT NOW…I was watching a couple old baseball games on the MLB network and I started noticing just how big some of the players were..Mark Mcgwire and Jose Canseco looked like they were NFL players and what not and this was a game from 1996. It is hard to imagine now that nobody really noticed until Canseco opened his mouth as to just how many people were cheating. Hitting a baseball is the hardest thing to do in sports…what was the slogan back then?? Oh yeah it was “Chicks dig the long ball”

  8. Robert L permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:06 pm

    I couldn’t agree with you more on all counts. All 104 names should be released. Period. Since the cat’s out of the bag, ARod is just one name out of 104. Where are the rest. And I do respect that ARod decided to ‘fess up. I don’t respect that he lied in the 60 minutes interview. If he had told the truth during that interview, this story would be a nothing story. “And in other news, a leak in the 2003 random testing confirmed what Arod had already admitted to that he took PED’s in 2003.” Done. End of story.

    Why isn’t the union rolling heads? Beacuase it’s their own heads they’d roll. Same with MLB. This is gross incompetence on all counts. Now it’s the union’s and MLB’s turn to say … “We F’d up. We apologize to the players for our stupidity and for violating their trust and confidentiality.” Will that ever happen? I’d be in shock.

  9. Mike permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:06 pm

    Hey Curt,
    One question: As a player who claims to never have done a PED, aren’t you upset that your union seemed more intent on protecting guys who were cheating over looking out for the interests of those who were going about things the right way?

  10. February 9, 2009 3:07 pm

    100% agree.

    It was a bold step and it was the right step. I don’t know how well he or the sport will be able to move on, but it’s a start.

    As for your statement “That the media chose to only ‘out’ him is a crime in and of itself.” I’m not so sure that was the case. From what I understand, Selena Roberts was in the middle of researching a book on A-Rod when she came across this information. I don’t believe that was given the names of the rest of the players who tested positive in ’03. I could be wrong about that. So if anyone is guilty of “outing” A-Rod over the others it would be whomever leaked that piece of info. Not the media.

    Until we hear otherwise.

  11. ballgirl permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:08 pm

    Too little, too late as far as I’m concerned. You don’t look into a camera and say you never did anything when you did. It’s interesting to note at the end of the Katie Couric interview on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVcqLt9sJLsI) that A-rod is asked about Berry Bonds and whether his record should have an * next to it to denounce his home-run king title. A-rod refuses to acknowledge Berry as having done anything wrong, stating “He’s innocent until proven guilty”. Perhaps this was A-rod rationale when he said he did not do, nor has he thought about doing steroids. He doesn’t see it as being wrong until proven guilty. We’ll now that he has been proven guilty, at least in the public eye, he is forced to fess up. I don’t see that as holding yourself accountable. Not at all.

  12. Josh permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:09 pm

    I have to agree that it is a horrible thing that only A-Rod is being dragged in the dirt.

    IT’S A BAD DAY FOR BASEBALL!

    As much as I love the Red Sox and despise the Yankees, there are some players that I have respect for as players and A-Rod WAS one of them. I sure hope Jeter kept his nose clean. I respect him as a person as well as a player.

  13. February 9, 2009 3:11 pm

    I don’t believe “one guy” is being made the whipping boy. He has plenty of company with Bonds and Clemens and Giambi and Pettitte and Palmeiro and Sosa and McGwire and many others.

    But ARod is special. Much like Bonds and Clemens. He’s a superstar. He was, by MLB’s standards, going to be the guy who brought “honor” back to the home run record. So this is much bigger than just picking on one player. This particular player has a lot to answer for. And, I’m sorry, but I disagree with my entire being that this admission is ARod “manning up”. He admitted to the use only because he got caught. He had a wonderful opportunity to truly “man up” on 60 Minutes. That ship, sadly, sailed.

  14. Dick Hertz permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:11 pm

    Kurt, we love you, man. You were the best (clean) pitcher of all time. No one was a better big game man than you. Please, please, please tell us you are going to become a pitching coach to teach a whole new generation of kids how important it is to throw strikes and get ahead in the count. Kurt Schilling was the best money pitcher of all time, and he had a natural strength, not a chemical one.

  15. Vava permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:12 pm

    Let me start by saying that I am not an A-Rod fan for the way he plays the game (he’s not above playing dishonestly to win at any cost is my impression), but I give him tonnes of credit for this admission. He’s gone up a notch in my book for standing up like a man and telling the truth. Baseball will benefit from this, sure, but more importantly his KIDS will benefit from this act by the Dad. The truth is often most difficult to admit, but in my opinion it is always the right choice.

    Lastly, you are absolutely correct in calling out those who isolated A-Rod out of the 104 who tested positive. Anything for a story I guess… These people are lower than Yankee Stadium dirt (not so subtle Yankee jab).

  16. Mark in Sturbridge permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:19 pm

    I agree with you on this Curt. You might not know the answer to this but what do younger players in the minors think when they see stuff like this? I understand that the drug testing there is better, but I am sure that some 19 year old sees the year that he put up in 2003, and has to think about getting that little extra push as he says, (“I needed something, a push”) to propel him to the bigs. Do you guys as major leaguers ever talk to the minors to tell them what happens, or should that fall on to individuals? And thank you for discussing the topic candidly, I myself have always had questions about the life style that baseball players live, and believe that it can’t be that easy.

  17. 38fanforlife permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:20 pm

    A-Rod is such a target. I kinda feel bad for him. Don’t get me wrong. Bosox fan and Yankee hater from way back. But it is his contract that even has Yank fans raising his expectations beyond what he is capable of. Then the post season rolls in for Alex and the pressure is on – and then – …bla. I mean bla to it’s blaist. It’s too bad to see this happen to what appears to be a semi-decent guy. I use ‘semi’ because he did in fact dis my Red Sox, dis my team Captain (who we all love) on that inphamis Pedro being a bull fighter el’ grandiosso display of pure ulimate and unique sports rivalry. The Zim did look kinda kooky that day. But that being that, if A-Rod used PHDs, then the so-called ‘greatest player ever’ stuff that sometimes gets thrown around needs to get flushed. Like (2) flushes and a plunger.

  18. Steve permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:20 pm

    It’s not as respectable to come clean after you’ve knowingly lied about the exact same thing. I would have tons of respect for the guy if in 2003 he had answered Katie Couric by saying “if all goes as planned nobody will ever see the 104 names on the list. But if they did, my name would be on it. I made a mistake and I’m sorry.”
    That would be some “manning up” that even I would have to appreciate. I’m not saying Alex didn’t show some balls by coming clean. I’m simply saying he only came clean when essentialy forced. He was not man enough to choose to do the right thing. That being said, I do respect the fact that he chose to end the lying now, instead of dragging it out and making an ass of himself like so many former heros.
    I think we can all forgive mistakes simply because we all make them. But the consious act of willingly lying is much harder to forgive. Let all the truth come out. All the names, all the dates, all the drugs. Let us, the fans decide who will get our full respect and admiration. And who will be directly linked to terms like “yeah, but…….”

  19. AL5000 permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:22 pm

    Curt,
    How can you say you want all 104 names released AND want to hold someone at MLBPA responsible for not following protocol? The protocaol was to never make any of the names public, and that is why all of YOU ballplayers agreed to reopen collective bargaining, am I wrong?

  20. February 9, 2009 3:24 pm

    I agree, atleast he said he did it. Wish all (Boston) players would admit it and lets turn the page.

  21. Eric permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:34 pm

    A Fraud. He’s a loser. I hope there is a big asterick next to each and every one of his stats. Schill, I disagree with you. He gets no credit for admitting it…cheating is cheating plain and simple.

  22. Loge131 permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:35 pm

    Good for him to own up to it – it would have been much worse for him if he didn’t. Can’t wait for the first Yankees game at Fenway!

  23. Izzy Michaels permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:36 pm

    You’re a tool.

  24. February 9, 2009 3:43 pm

    Well put. He shouldn’t have done it – he’s a world class talent as much as I don’t like him. But kudos for owning it.

  25. Droopy permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:45 pm

    A-Rod is a liar. He is sorry for lying and if this never came up he would still be lying. How is it that someone does not know what he took yet he knows it was banned?

  26. February 9, 2009 3:46 pm

    Curt i love how everyone listens to the crap and bull you throw out. does anybody actually care your opinion on any topic. as far as i am concerned my opinion is that you are a bumb ballplayer and always were. your only good years were 2 seasons with the red sox and in 2001 when you beat the yankees in the world series. you are just like any other guy from boston. you win a world series and now all of a sudden everyones a red sox fan. where were they all the previous 80 years? nobody would admit to being red sox fans.

    you only put in your opinion when nobody is talking about you. you should just retire. you are a nobody and your stats show it. it doesnt matter to me your opinion on the steroid era. i may as well believe that other bumb Conseco who is in the same boat as you. you are upset that the spot light is not on you because you are afraid people will forget about you (which i hope happens because i know i will).

    dont put your opinion out there because unless you work for MLBPA nobody cares!!

  27. Komish permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:46 pm

    Curt,
    This whole mess should have been stopped By George Bush as he left office. He should have pardoned the whole mess, everyone involved to this point. Baseball could have moved on. As a good Republican, he could have done the right thing…..

    Now consider this, a friend of mine who lives in Az. (will not mention his name as I will use the sports writers best friend, “condition of anonymity”) worked for the testing lab on the West Coast and was contracted as a temporary employee in the lab as an expert on this project. He was privy to the list. He no longer works there so his confidentiality release he signed is no longer valid. He told me over the summer that Ricky Henderson tested positive in the 2003 anonymous tests, he was playing for the Dodgers his last year in 2003. He said the 104 names will never come out because the union was so strong at killing all the data. Now that Ricky is in the Hall of Fame, a precedence has been set so all players should be allowed in……Mark McGuire should get his acceptance speech ready for next year.

    My question to you, now hat one has been elected, do they all go in????

  28. Ben Clingain permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:47 pm

    Kurt
    am Sox and Man Utd fan and one area of the A-Rod affair is puzzling i.e “Follow the money” The pills Alex popped cost $$$, so Alex paid, Mr X made a few grand, tax-free. So who does the dreaded Taxman chase for his cut??
    And one area is astounding, i.e The Players Union knew all 104 names. Were they all told (nudge nudge, wink wink)”You may or may not be one of the 104″, thus giving them the excuse to carry on doing it?
    Finally, I hope you come back to Boston, just don’t pitch against the Indians
    Best
    Ben from Cleveland via Ireland and Manchester

  29. John J Ross permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:53 pm

    It should be all or every body.

  30. Ken H permalink
    February 9, 2009 3:54 pm

    You know, the more I read/hear about the steroid users I believe the best way that we as fans can deal with it is to approach it in this way-

    To appreciate the athletic skills these people possess and realize that they are human and prone to mistakes, as we all are. We generally celebrate them for their skills, not their qualities as human beings (although we can also celebrate them for that to as the case may be). Taking steroids increases their strength and recuperative times from injuries, not their athletic qualities of hitting and fielding a baseball. So let us enjoy them as they perform their skills and not place them on any pedestals where they are no more deserving than anyone else.

    The lesser players who also use illegal drugs are just as guilty as the stars and by dwelling only on the star players we exaggerate the negativeness of their actions much more than if all the others are called out too.

  31. February 9, 2009 3:59 pm

    “Manned Up” ??????

    He got caught! I think we need to have a better definition of the term, “being a man.” How about telling the truth when it counts for soemthing, like before you’re outed.

    The only thing he is sorry about is getting caught. I’ll believe these guys are sorry when they admit to doing something wrong before they get caught.

  32. Babe Ruth permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:01 pm

    So how about these other 103 players? Would you agree that they should also speak up now before their names eventually hit the papers?

    I see it as, Either fess up now and get it over with or don’t bother apologizing later on. No more apologies. We know you’re out there, still trying to hide.

    Fess up now, help us all including yourselves get past this era.

  33. Jonathan permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:03 pm

    This finally make A-Rod a little bit likable. I appreciate that he manned up.

  34. Jason permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:08 pm

    Curt I have every respect for your opinion and I know you are looking at this as a player but I am sorry would he admit it if we didn’t already know? If the S.I. article never comes out we never hear about this. Pretty much the only thing I will credit him for is being smart enought to look at Clemens and Bonds and realize he doesn’t want people digging harder. Thats the best thing you can say about his “Admission”.

  35. Matthew Veale permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:08 pm

    It’s the same as the media’s fascination with any other celebrity scandal. Unfortunately, since MLB won’t release the test results, though, they are free to speculate and point fingers at whomever will sell them the most papers or get them the most viewers. Gotta wonder… with A-Rod admitting he used ‘roids, McGwire admitting he used ‘roids, and Bonds under investigation, how many other power hitters are named in the report also?

    That said, he gets some credit for admitting it.

  36. lwinlc permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:08 pm

    I think he’s probably doing the best thing by owning up to his use of PEDs. However, I cannot condone it, cannot respect him and think that he’s been coached as to how to put the best spin on it. I have always found him to be sleazy and self-centered and nothing’s changed. It’s sad. I do agree that the list should be made public so all on it can take their lumps.

  37. Eric S. permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:17 pm

    As a baseball fan, I am under the impression that once you recognize and apologize for taking any substances, nothing else happen to the player. Where is the accountability, where are the sanctions ( Petite, Giambi etc…).
    Alex, recognized he used setroides because he was pressured to be the highest paid player. This is not acceptable to me, how about the fans who got cheated? The owners who over pay a players? That is plain wrong. Spring training is around the corner and I simply do not know what to think about the beautiful game of Baseball…

  38. February 9, 2009 4:17 pm

    Watching the ESPN clip on their website, I feel like A-Rod was being honest. I respect that. I can forgive that, especially since he hasn’t (apparently) failed a test since ’03. It shows me that yeah…he realized he shouldn’t be doin’ what he was doin’ and cut it out ASAP. I like that. That, to me, is totally different than Clemens, McGwire, or Bonds.

    I would still vote for A-Rod for the HOF after this. If he tried to weasel out of it or if he’s kept taking steroids since ’03…I’d feel very different about it.

    And you’re right – someone(s) should lose their job. I’m not sure if I agree that the rest should be outed just to make things fair for Alex. These guys all understood it to be an anonymous test and outing them would just be doin’ them all wrong in order to appease the same wrong done to one player. I don’t think that really fixes the problem, but makes it worse.

    I’ll definitely tune in to SC @ 6p for the whole interview.

  39. Posthumus Agrippa permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:22 pm

    Agreed. This sets him apart from others like Giambi, Bonds, and (possibly) Clemens, but the guy is still a cheater. If Selig and the MLB want to retain any credibility, at the bare minimum, Rodriguez’s 2003 MVP award should stripped.

  40. February 9, 2009 4:26 pm

    I agree that all of the names should be listed. I bet all these players are keeping they eyes glued to the TV waiting for someone to say and the rest of the names are posted online. In addition, why are you making a Yankee jab, he wasn’t with him when he was on ‘roids.

  41. Joey permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:35 pm

    I agree that has come clean and there is something to be said for that. But why do it after you’ve been outed? He is just catering to his future, that’s all.

  42. Michelle permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:36 pm

    But he “manned up” and admitted his mistake only AFTER his name was released; after he was outed. This was in direct contradiction to his “no” answer on the 60-minute interview. He should have owned up to it then.

  43. Jimmy permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:40 pm

    Doesn’t this look a little staged? He’s basically given every one of the 103 players named a template to work from. Admit some limited scope of steroid use and let the public forget. I’m not feeling too good about this. He still cheated and there should be consequences.

  44. Joe S. (San Diego) permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:44 pm

    Couldn’t have said it better. At least he didn’t play the song and dance game. You are exactly right on holding people in MLB offices and MLBPA held accountable.

    It is a joke to just witch hunt A-Rod. Let the list of the 103 others come out. If all these players would just say hey we did it….fans would be forgiving. Just ask Jason Giambo and Andy Petite.

    Love your site here and love that you speak your mind! If you’re not too busy later this summer, the Cubs could use that arm of yours to end our miserable streak!

  45. February 9, 2009 4:47 pm

    I agree with Mr Schilling. A-Rod admitted that he used PEDs rather than using the deny, deny, deny strategy that so many others have and continue to use. Of course , his past public denial on 60 minutes mitigates his integrity, but at least he realizes he is now on a sinking ship and the best option is to admit he made a mistake. Haven’t we all in our 20’s?

  46. bill permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:52 pm

    Curt once again you are bad mouthing your union brothers and your union leaders,the same union that fought the battles so that ballplayers can get the money that they do. Coming from someone who got 8m for nothing,I think you should be very thankfull to your union.

  47. John Smith permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:54 pm

    If you think we should all “move on”, there is no worse way to do so than to release all the players names. As a baseball player, I’m sure you can sympathize with A-Rod that back in the day, times were “loose” and at his age, everyone is “stupid”. It IS wrong that “one guy is being held out there for everyone to pencil whip”, but by releasing the names of players, some who probably did not know what they were doing, you aren’t pencil whipping one player, you’r “pencil whipping” many.

  48. Tom permalink
    February 9, 2009 4:58 pm

    I totally agree! I mean, he only apologized because he got caught, but at least he isn’t trying to flat out deny it like Bonds and Clemens. The funny thing is though, I guarantee that those two set a precedent (especially Clemens) that denying will only dig your grave deeper. It would be interesting to see how this would have played out if Clemens was never caught. Would A-Rod still apologize so easily? I guess the big difference here is that there was solid evidence saying he did do it.

  49. Scott C. Day permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:03 pm

    I do not give him credit. He was asked point blank on 60 Minutes last year if he used performance enhancing drugs and said , “NO”. He only admitted it because he was caught. He is a liar and a cheat….. on and off the field.

  50. Th New Number 2 permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:07 pm

    Actually, not so refreshing. Refreshing would have been if he admitted it from the get-go. All of these guys, like Giambi and Pettite before him, only admit to anything when they get caught. I guess these guys are better than say, Roger, but to deny, deny, deny, oops now I’m caught, admit, is not refreshing at all.

    I agree with you Curt about “the 103”. What would be refreshing is if someone on that list came out and said something before that list get’s published. I know though with that so much money involved or at stake, the deny and admit only if I’m caught thing will continue. That list has to get published tho, or everyone else suffers.

    PS: Love the blog Curt. Keep it up please. (and of course, thanks for 04-07!)

  51. Buntman permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:12 pm

    I totally agree – nice to see somebody step up. The fact that MLB and the Union had a drug test just to see how bad it was seems very wrong to me! I hear talking heads getting mad about the names being released and how wrong it was ( I agree) but how about the fact that they had to have an exploratory test to see how bad it is? Shouldn’t even considering that give them enough of a clue???

  52. Howard permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:17 pm

    You say so much, yet you clammed up in front of Congress, Curt. I am a Yankee fan that believes you belong in the Hall of Fame. I am also a baseball fan that doesn’t appreciate how you insert yourself into things. You have a blog that you know is read by many people. If you had been so outspoken the whole time, as the face of the anti steroid movement, fine. But, you just seem to grandstand and hog attention. When it was time to pony up and name names or discuss your feelings under oath, you said nothing. So, because of that, I think we’d all appreciate it if you’d just keep your opinions to yourself on this one; just imagine you’re sitting before Congress.

  53. Tom Mc permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:28 pm

    I agree Curt that it is refreshing that Alex owned up to making a bad choice and I applaud him for not copping out and saying that he did it once. However it doesn’t change my mind that if you cheated you DO NOT GO INTO THE HALL OF FAME!!!!

  54. Julio permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:33 pm

    Yes ARod did man up. Now it’s time for everyone to man up such as the person who took these samples under false pretenses. These were to see if there was a problem in baseball and the persons who gave the samples were under the impression that these would never be revealed. Yet here we are six years later outing one man out of 104 and turning his life around. It seems that whenever the government gets involved you only hear about the stars that will get some prosecutor headlines. This is not the way to solve the problem and turning to politicians is making the problem worse not better.

  55. Donna permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:33 pm

    Curt,
    I have never been a “fan” of Alex Rodriguez, but in this instance,I totally agree with you. He was absolutely “right on” to admit what he did and to put an end to the “did he,didn’t he”. His being totally honest now,in this situation,was the best thing that he could do…Important Note: I am here in New York City and Sunday night on the 11 P.M. local TV broadcast news,before A-Rod admitted to what he did,the news specifically mentioned what you posted on this blog on Saturday,specifically mentioned you,spoke of what you had posted about A-Rod and said how great it is that you spoke out,spoke up when nobody else did. They said on the New York City news broadcast that what you did and said on Saturday was a good thing! I have always said the same thing,not only in regards to Alex Rodriguez but in terms of other topics as well,so I thank you for speaking out and for sharing with us your thoughts,your feelings. I not only value your opinion but find it really great that you are always candid and honest with how you feel. Don’t ever stop!
    Donna,New York City.

  56. Veronica permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:38 pm

    So…the guys who gave advance notice to players about testing, *they* should get fired. But the guys who took steroids, cheated in the first place, and only admitted it after they were outed, they get to keep their jobs? I don’t think so.

  57. MattySox permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:43 pm

    How much of a man do you have to be to “admit” something that everybody already knows? He would have “manned up” if he’d admitted it BEFORE evidence came out that he f’d up, not after the fact. At this point, his “apology” and “manning up” are simply a desperate attempt to save a reputation he knows is in complete tatters. That’s not being a man; that’s being a spin doctor. Is it better than just denying it like Roger and Barry? Sure. But it’s still not good enough. I agree that the other 103 names should come out. That’s not fair to A-Rod, but he put himself in this situation. Pretending to be sorry about after the fact isn’t enough to earn a pass, or our compassion.

  58. Edgtho permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:50 pm

    Amen. At least he had that much honor. By the way, my local paper’s (Star-Ledger) sports page made sure to quote you word for word on the cover. Something to the effect of “Shilling believes all 105 should be named.”

  59. Tru permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:52 pm

    …”That the media chose to only ‘out’ him is a crime in and of itself.”…

    Is it a foregone conclusion that who ever had Rodriguez’ name has all the others?

    As it came to pass, based upon what was supposedly agreed to, it appears that Gene Orza has a bit of explaining to do. Were not the lists and tests to be destroyed upon their completion? There’s a controversy floating out there right now, in that Orza kept trying to find more ways to counter the results of the positives, and then the Fed stepped in.

    Rodriguez will suffer no punishment beyond reputation, as he was granted immunity, as were all the others based upon the provisions for testing. But I’ll disagree with you about releasing the other names, Curt. It’s one thing for someone to have spilled the beans about Rodriguez, but if I’m AirBud and Fehr the Magnificent, I’d be all over SI demanding the source, and then put this whole business to rest.

  60. Penny Fore permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:54 pm

    Yes, I agree, I’m glad he just flat out came and said he did it, but I really wish that he hadn’t tried to sweep it under the rug a year ago when there was no evidence. To me, the *real* manly thing to do would’ve been to fess up when Katie Couric or others had asked him, before someone had to catch him with his hand in the cookie jar. Now people are going to wonder if he really stopped, and are going to wait around until that hypothetical post-2003 positive test (which may or may not exist) comes out someday. It’s sad. It really is.

  61. Rocky permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:54 pm

    Curt, I generally share your perspectives, but let’s not lose track of the fact that the guy’s known since 2003. He only “manned up” when it became the expedient thing to do for Alex Rodriguez. I’m not so easily impressed.

  62. Derek permalink
    February 9, 2009 5:59 pm

    Curt..I do agree with you about A-Rod manning up. It is refreshing to see a player finally admit he was wrong. As for you pushing to have all names released…you better make sure your name isn’t on that list…that would suck.

  63. Bernie permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:04 pm

    There are no more heroes.

  64. February 9, 2009 6:06 pm

    What sets AROD apart from Bonds and Palmieri..is that he said sorry…AROD hits for average that has nothing to do with power or homeruns…he is the purest player that has come along since Pete Rose…history judges those that humble and know they made mistakes….Zman sends

  65. CaioHac permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:25 pm

    I think all the 104 players have to be named, because it´s unfair that some players that never cheated in their carrer have to be considered a suspect in this issue.

    A-Rod admitted that he used performance-enhancing drugs…Ok, but It´s easy to play the honest man after he had been caught…(and after lying on the 60 minutes)
    A-Rod, Bonds, Roger, and all the 104 players must have a * in their stats, and have not be considered for records or Milestones, and never put their feet in Cooperstown…

  66. Tony Mastro permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:42 pm

    I never thought I would respond to some of the stupid stuff in your blog. But believe it or not I admire your baseball skills and thought you were a stand up guy. I am and always will be a Yankee fan! But I don’t shove aside the great moments some Red Sox’s have had and have had contributed to baseball. I haven’t read a lot of your blog so I can only comment on 2/9/09. Your in my opinion a better then average athelete, certainly not one of baseballs best! This whole disrespect thing for the Yankees is much more than jealousy. The greatest moments of your somewhat forgettable career were against the Yankees. The whole bloody sock thing-nonsense. That sock should be in the Hall Of Shame. Respect Yankees for their achievements and stop dwelling on the negative. Put these limited occurrences up against the Yankee tradition and history and you will see why so many atheletes, including you, want to be Yankees more than anything.

  67. February 9, 2009 6:46 pm

    Curt, well said. Your point is well-taken. All of this stuff happened because it was allowed to happen. I’m more disgusted at MLB/MLBPA as opposed to just A-Rod, Clemens, or Bonds.

    Baseball will survive. Especially when idiots like me continue to buy tickets.

    But what might not survive is the one advantage baseball has over all the other sports: a rich history. Thanks to everyone who allowed steroids to infiltrate the game, numbers such as 60, 61, 714, and 755 have been cheapened.

    And don’t think the kids aren’t paying attention. Yesterday my 10-year old son – the one who jumped for joy with me when the Phillies won the championship – asked me point blank if Ryan Howard also does steroids.

    What does that tell you when a 10-year old starts questioning his heroes? It tells me that baseball has lost its credibility. It tells me that it’s entirely up to me to be a hero and a role model. (Yes, I know that’s a good thing. But it’s a shame that today’s kids can’t look up to pro athletes like I looked up to a Hank Aaron or a Mike Schmidt). I may not be able to hit a 90-mph fastball but at least I still know right from wrong. Geez.

    Ahh, I’m rambling. But thank you for having the guts to tell it like it is. We need more people to step forward and say “enough.”

    Best regards,
    Drolz

  68. Mikey P permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:46 pm

    The only reason he confessed and I mean ONLY, is because he got caught! Plain and simple, cut and dry! And I am sure that the people around him told him to come clean. It probably didn’t enter his mind until he asked someone close to him. The guy is a fool and a fraud.

  69. Cliff permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:51 pm

    Curt,

    He only admitted it because he got caught. Come on. I’m sure you watched the video. He had a script and forgot the words at a few points. He conveniently just did PEDs during the time period of the random test? I think anyone who thinks it ended there is naive.

  70. Eddie Velasquez permalink
    February 9, 2009 6:53 pm

    Spoken like a true professional. (Other than the darn Yankee jab. You can help yourself, can you?) 🙂

  71. Gary permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:06 pm

    1) I agree that the 103 should be released, I’ve always wanted to have that information so that the cheaters can be outed and the game can move forward.

    2) There is only 1 simple solution left to save the game from itself (not that it would be legal, allowed, or that players would do it, but…):

    Solution: Have players take polygraph tests to legitimize their numbers!!!!!

    If they did that, then I, as a fan, would forever be satisfied of that player’s records and feats, and the stigma would be removed from them. That’s the only way to put numbers on a pedistal in this era.

    3) Don’t forget that one of the most disgraceful aspects of the A-Rod story, unlike the other 103 who have remained silent about their steroid use, is that A-Rod LIED to Katie Couric, to the nation, fans, to baseball about his steroid use.

    He lied. Dishonest. That’s worse than a positive test leaking and having to admit to it.

    4) As much as I appreciate A-Rod’s apology, it was WEAK when you look further into it. He owes his apology and the first interview to Katie Couric of CBS for having lied to her. He should talk to SI.com because they broke the story. But what does A-Rod do? Goes to ESPN, and gets Peter Gammins to lob softball questions at him! There were some good questions, but no serious follow ups, he did not press for specifics, often letting A-Rod off the hook. Gimmie a break. Is A-Rod scared to be questioned by reporters that don’t know him personally? He repeatedly threw SI.com under the bus, but not the Union. Oh brother. SI.com denies A-Rod’s claims. He sounds more angry that he was exposed and got caught, rather than being sorry for using steroids. This story will get stranger by the day.

    Was A-Rod really just naive back then? Or is he dancing around the questions?

    The best athlete in the world didn’t know exactly what chemicals he was putting in his body for “3” years??? He didn’t know he was stacking 2 steroids? He didn’t know that the steroid he used adds strength, and the other makes you lean? The trainer/supplier didn’t tell that to him? A-Rod didn’t ask questions? Right. I don’t believe it for a second. It’s Barry Bond’s excuse. A-Rod says, “I didn’t know what it was”… For “3” years???

    He doesn’t know when he started using it? He didn’t name whether it was a player or gym person that introduced him? *Does he feel guilty that he has a $305 million contract from NY mostly based on his 3 years in Texas where he cheated? He didn’t know steroids was illegal? Did he really spend 2 days in the Bahamas, or was it 2 days prepping his answers with Scott Boras?

    Keep this in mind as he throws Jose Canseco under the bus: Jose passed a polygraph test! A-Rod has not taken one, and he probably won’t. Point: Canseco.

    5) How on earth did the Yankees leave out anything to do with steroids in A-Rod’s contract??? Nice work Boras, A-Rod. Good negotiating. Amazing foresight. This is not a mistake on their part, no way.

    6) I’ve always suspected A-Rod was using. This is a surprise?? Look at his body size, geez. And by the way, he’s still huge. And there is no current test for HGH. Does he still use? Can we believe him? He’s a known liar. I’ll never believe him unless he takes a polygraph and makes the results public from a credible administrator.

    7) Like it or not, Jose Canseco told the truth. And I’ve always been glad he did. That’s what it took for these guys to come clean (or deny). The guys sitting next to Curt Schilling in front of Congress did not tell the truth. Who’s next?

    There will be more names, big names. Just look at the rosters of players on the Red Sox, Rangers, and the A.L/N.L. All-Star teams for 2003. Big names. The cultures in these clubhouses included many big named players. Google the rosters, and you’ll get a glimpse of some of the next 103 players to be named later.

    8) The 104 player list was supposed to be private and destroyed. But it wasn’t. Therefore, it should be exposed, and let it taint the players that are guilty.

    Blame the Union. Their negligence of leaving evidence lying around is costly to the players. I hope this finally brings the Union heads down. Tipping off players to tests? Disturbing, but not surprising. That was also in the Mitchell report and should be independently investigated.

    The head of the NHL union resigned after their lockout season. The heads of MLBPA should do the same because they have completely bungled most aspects of the steroid issues, they truely are incompetent, and they’ve thrust a cloud on ALL of the thousands of players who played in the era (1990-present).

    9) I’m forever a fan of the game…

    Whether on TV, in person, or playing at the park. That will never change. The difference the steroid revelations make for me? The steroid users won’t make the game less fun for me, they just make it so that I can’t believe any of their numbers. I’ll just teach my children who the real heros are (i.e., Curt Schilling, Nolan Ryan, Reggie Jackson, etc.), explain what mistakes the guilty players made, and explain the right path, and hope they take it. There are things that all of us should be doing anyway, while enjoying the game.

  72. Gary permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:07 pm

    1) I agree that the 103 should be released, I’ve always wanted to have that information so that the cheaters can be outed and the game can move forward.

    2) There is only 1 simple solution left to save the game from itself (not that it would be legal, allowed, or that players would do it, but…):

    Solution: Have players take polygraph tests to legitimize their numbers!!!!!

    If they did that, then I, as a fan, would forever be satisfied of that player’s records and feats, and the stigma would be removed from them. That’s the only way to put numbers on a pedistal in this era.

    3) Don’t forget that one of the most disgraceful aspects of the A-Rod story, unlike the other 103 who have remained silent about their steroid use, is that A-Rod LIED to Katie Couric, to the nation, fans, to baseball about his steroid use.

    He lied. Dishonest. That’s worse than a positive test leaking and having to admit to it.

    4) As much as I appreciate A-Rod’s apology, it was WEAK when you look further into it. He owes his apology and the first interview to Katie Couric of CBS for having lied to her. He should talk to SI.com because they broke the story. But what does A-Rod do? Goes to ESPN, and gets Peter Gammins to lob softball questions at him! There were some good questions, but no serious follow ups, he did not press for specifics, often letting A-Rod off the hook. Gimmie a break. Is A-Rod scared to be questioned by reporters that don’t know him personally? He repeatedly threw SI.com under the bus, but not the Union. Oh brother. SI.com denies A-Rod’s claims. He sounds more angry that he was exposed and got caught, rather than being sorry for using steroids. This story will get stranger by the day.

    Was A-Rod really just naive back then? Or is he dancing around the questions?

    The best athlete in the world didn’t know exactly what chemicals he was putting in his body for “3” years??? He didn’t know he was stacking 2 steroids? He didn’t know that the steroid he used adds strength, and the other makes you lean? The trainer/supplier didn’t tell that to him? A-Rod didn’t ask questions? Right. I don’t believe it for a second. It’s Barry Bond’s excuse. A-Rod says, “I didn’t know what it was”… For “3” years???

    He doesn’t know when he started using it? He didn’t name whether it was a player or gym person that introduced him? *Does he feel guilty that he has a $305 million contract from NY mostly based on his 3 years in Texas where he cheated? He didn’t know steroids was illegal? Did he really spend 2 days in the Bahamas, or was it 2 days prepping his answers with Scott Boras?

    Keep this in mind as he throws Jose Canseco under the bus: Jose passed a polygraph test! A-Rod has not taken one, and he probably won’t. Point: Canseco.

    5) How on earth did the Yankees leave out anything to do with steroids in A-Rod’s contract??? Nice work Boras, A-Rod. Good negotiating. Amazing foresight. This is not a mistake on their part, no way.

    6) I’ve always suspected A-Rod was using. This is a surprise?? Look at his body size, geez. And by the way, he’s still huge. And there is no current test for HGH. Does he still use? Can we believe him? He’s a known liar. I’ll never believe him unless he takes a polygraph and makes the results public from a credible administrator.

    7) Like it or not, Jose Canseco told the truth. And I’ve always been glad he did. That’s what it took for these guys to come clean (or deny). The guys sitting next to Curt Schilling in front of Congress did not tell the truth. Who’s next?

    There will be more names, big names. Just look at the rosters of players on the Red Sox, Rangers, and the A.L/N.L. All-Star teams for 2003. Big names. The cultures in these clubhouses included many big named players. Google the rosters, and you’ll get a glimpse of some of the next 103 players to be named later.

    8 ) The 104 player list was supposed to be private and destroyed. But it wasn’t. Therefore, it should be exposed, and let it taint the players that are guilty.

    Blame the Union. Their negligence of leaving evidence lying around is costly to the players. I hope this finally brings the Union heads down. Tipping off players to tests? Disturbing, but not surprising. That was also in the Mitchell report and should be independently investigated.

    The head of the NHL union resigned after their lockout season. The heads of MLBPA should do the same because they have completely bungled most aspects of the steroid issues, they truely are incompetent, and they’ve thrust a cloud on ALL of the thousands of players who played in the era (1990-present).

    9) I’m forever a fan of the game…

    Whether on TV, in person, or playing at the park. That will never change. The difference the steroid revelations make for me? The steroid users won’t make the game less fun for me, they just make it so that I can’t believe any of their numbers. I’ll just teach my children who the real heros are (i.e., Curt Schilling, Nolan Ryan, Reggie Jackson, etc.), explain what mistakes the guilty players made, and explain the right path, and hope they take it. There are things that all of us should be doing anyway, while enjoying the game.

  73. Gary permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:08 pm

    My earlier comment had a smily face for 8 ) , okay to fix it.

  74. February 9, 2009 7:17 pm

    Curt, he ‘manned up?’ No he did not. Manning up would have been coming out and saying it before he was caught. That’s not manning up. Had he come out before all this and said “Yeah, I messed up. I took steroids,” without anyone catching him, tha’s manning up. Who knows how long he would have kept this in hiding had he not been caught!

  75. Gary permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:31 pm

    How did all the players in the Mitchell report feel that were named, and here A-Rod goes on TV, “I haven’t taken steroids”? Who can like this guy?

  76. Gary permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:33 pm

    Peter Gammons forgot the most important questions of all, how convenient:

    ARE YOU CURRENTLY TAKING STEROIDS, HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE, OR ANY OTHER PERFORMANCE ENHANCING DRUG???

    How can you forget that??

  77. tdmtown permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:53 pm

    So now that the full interview is out, do you still wish to “thank” him.
    I thought he was pretty smug, and not all that apologetic, or sincere.
    He accepted “responsibility” but it was a vague and “loose” responsibility,
    in my opinion.
    It was a very UN-humble apology.

    He also makes (apparently false, according to an SI press release) accusations about the woman who broke the story.
    If he can’t prove what he just said about her, he’s now open to a clear and obvious slander lawsuit. Time will tell.

    Sounds to me like just a well rehearsed pile of BS to get him through a pile of crap he created for himself.

  78. satch permalink
    February 9, 2009 7:55 pm

    gary – he said he took it from 01 to 03 & at no other time

  79. Keith permalink
    February 9, 2009 8:00 pm

    Curt —

    I don’t get it.

    First, you say that all of the positive tests should be released.

    Then you say somebody at the union should be fired for failure to follow the testing protocol. I assume the protocol failure has to do with the fact that those results were supposed to be kept anonymous?

    So folks should be fired for letting a name out, and the proper response to this is to let all the names out? That doesn’t follow.

  80. Chris permalink
    February 9, 2009 8:49 pm

    Curt:

    You write “the media chose to only ‘out’ him is a crime in and of itself.”
    Does this mean that you believe that the media has other names and is choosing to withhold them?

    I am not sure one way or the other. What I would argue is that he HAD to be singled out, how else would Alex and only Alex be called on this? A lot of work had to be done to match names and test sample numbers, to players. There is no way Alex was a random incident. I think the entire list was matched up and all names on the list were put to positive results. From there, to here, I am of the mind some pretty underhanded stuff was done to have only his name surface.

  81. smitti79 permalink
    February 9, 2009 9:45 pm

    I say publish the 104, and fire em all and purge their names from baseball’s record books…if there are no teeth, there’s nothing gonna change. (And keep the lying suck-up Congress out of this–if baseball can’t clean up its act, as if congress could help? HA.)

  82. Dr. S. permalink
    February 9, 2009 9:51 pm

    I disagree Curt. Alex didn’t “Man up”. He was caught in a lie. He was exposed. He was outted by SI. So, he and his handlers decided that Alex had better admit what was already known. After all, look at the problems Clemens is facing by taking the denial route. So, Alex confessed to using steroids for those three years. Why? Because there was no denying it and, more importantly, there is no punishment for using steroids during that time. It was a smart move and safe plea. But, that is not “Maning up”! That is not owning up! That is not doing the right thing. It is merely a tactic to CLEAN IT UP. Nothing more than a calculated strategy to make Alex look better.

    As for whether A-Rod continued to use…Don’t think for a minute Alex stopped using steroids after 2003. Leopards don’t change their spots. Cheaters don’t stop voluntarily. Or, willingly. For A-Rod the pressure to produce became even greater, don’t forget. In my opinion, when Alex went to the Yankees he relied on the protection of the Players Union to give him a heads up before his urine screens. What’s more, he probably started using some performance enhancing substances that aren’t tested. He just kept right on cheating. What makes me think so? The proof is in his stats. He’s put up bigger numbers and hit more HR’s. Yet, he’s passed all his drug tests. Go figure.

  83. Tim permalink
    February 9, 2009 10:11 pm

    I am happy to see a player finally owning up to what he did. Unlike Bonds and Clemens who keep dragging this on with legal battles. I wish a few other players would start admitting also. You must feel pretty good about your career facing all of those juiced up hitters and still putting up great stats. I used to be a fan of Arod because of his stats and his abilities. Not anymore, but I respect him because he is taking responsibility for his actions. Good luck with your career or retirement or whatever you decide to do.

  84. February 9, 2009 10:19 pm

    Seriously.

    You need to stop saying things I agree with. Right now.

    I’m simply not equipped to deal with this.

  85. Brian permalink
    February 9, 2009 11:02 pm

    Shilling,

    You really need to keep your mouth shut. I hate how arrogant you are and you think you are above everyone else. You played with a lot of teams and I am sure you are previ to some players that were using Roids, especially your last team. I find it comical that the Red Sox don’t have one player that was either listed with Senator Mitchell’s report or perhaps this report.

    GET OVER YOURSELF…..

  86. Bernie permalink
    February 9, 2009 11:32 pm

    Does anyone believe that A-Rod’s used of steroids took place only between 2001-2003? He lied about it before and only apologized when caught.

  87. Bernie permalink
    February 9, 2009 11:33 pm

    I’d like to see A-Rod agree to public disclosure of his drug tests from this point forward. Perhaps then, if his numbers are in the neighborhood of what he’s done in the past, then he’ll be more credible. Chances of that happening…zero!

  88. February 9, 2009 11:37 pm

    Well, regardless of whether or not A-Rod manned up (not sure if it’s manning up when you man up only after being caught), it’s time for the fans to man up too.

    I’ll man up and admit I kept going to MLB games after it was way too obvious what was going on. So did millions of other fans. We fed the beast.

    I’ll man up and admit that because I love baseball so much, I’ve overlooked a lot of stuff in other sports that should also make us go “hmmm.”

    For example, it’s been said that concussions are on the rise in the NHL because today’s hockey players are much bigger, stronger, and faster than in past generations. Hmmmm.

    Same thing in the NBA. We now have small forwards built like linebackers. Speaking of linebackers, that’s what several NFL quarterbacks look like. Not to implicate these guys for anything – but if you sent Roethlisberger or McNabb back to the ’80s in a time machine, they’d definitely be All-Pro linebackers. The sad thing is that they and many other athletes could be clean but we’ll always wonder in the back of our minds. In the current sports climate it’s hard to trust people anymore.

    So the most important question of all is… how do we regain that trust?

  89. skipjack permalink
    February 9, 2009 11:40 pm

    I watched his performance. I have been interviewing criminals for over 20 years. His performance was typical of the type of response one gets from a criminal after he has been caught. Watch his body language and his eye movement. There was not a bit of sincerity in his admission. He’s sorry he got caught, and maybe even hoping no-one will dig deeper.

  90. TxRngerFan permalink
    February 10, 2009 1:28 am

    Under NO circumstances will I give Alex credit for his admission to PED abuse. Simply stated, Rodriguez had undeniably been caught with his hand in the steroid jar and as has been reported elsewhere, personally chose an extremely BIASED Peter Gammons to “tell his story” to. In the interview he states that he was “unaware of the things he was ingesting during his days as a Ranger” that is COMPLETE BULLSHIT when you consider who his team-mates were during those days. Sports Illustrated senior writer Selena Roberts is to be commended for her investigative journalism in what will undoubtedly become the highest selling issue of SI’s long history.
    To A-Rod, I eagerly await your appearances at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, for the Bronx cheers you will be DESERVINGLY receiving will be deafening!
    Throughout even their leanest times which through the years have been plenty, I have stood proud to call myself a Texas Ranger fan, even in spite of the idiocy we have in present ownership and with the black eye that OUR franchise is now enduring, again I PROUDLY wear my Rangers cap with the hope of a very bright future ahead.
    Councilman Gary Gage
    Blue Mound, Texas

  91. Bill Yost permalink
    February 10, 2009 1:46 am

    To the man who said ” There are no more heroes”, Jeff Jacobs from the Hartford Courant said it best on Sunday: “The pilot who saved 155 lives on the Hudson is a hero. Your neighbor’s son patrolling Baghdad is a hero. The EMTs who saved your life when you had a heart attack are heroes. Heroes are all around us and they don’t need gold medals or a plaque at Cooperstown to prove it.”

  92. Susan permalink
    February 10, 2009 2:17 am

    Let’s be fair and name all 104 players, even though none were supposed to be named.
    Curt, you named a child after a Yankee player, so the “Yankee” name drop was immature(not to mention with testing, ARod has been clean as an Yankee).
    We can see the names but looking at stats and bodies, your former team mates were juiced-Jason Varitek, Johnny Damon and likely, Big Papi Ortiz. Let’s be fair.

  93. February 10, 2009 5:24 am

    A-Roid didn’t man up. That would’ve been admitting it before he was nabbed. Now he’s doing the the opposite of manning up. He’s trying to save his shattered legacy and $.

  94. Saul Pressman permalink
    February 10, 2009 6:28 am

    I want to know every last name of the remaining 103 on the damn list. I don’t care who’s on it. Make their names public immediately.

    I’m pretty sure they’ll be rival fans and ownership pointing fingers at A-Rod while the very possibility of one of their own hometown heroes being as tainted as A-Rod is hidden under cover of darkness. It’s not a stretch to suppose many fans who are enjoying this latest dose of Yankees schadenfreude are dreading the outing of one of their own. Let’s be fair: get those names out there and do right by the clean players and end speculation in this particular instance.

    As for the man who was so vilified for his books proclaiming the rampant use of steroids in baseball, José Canseco has shown more class than most lately, by not gloating or wanting the spotlight in the midst of all of this. When approached by the press for the A-Rod story he is said to have replied something like, “Old news. Later.”

    Who would’ve thought Canseco would turn out to be more upstanding than the baseball press? Or the former players now at the MLB Network–I’m looking at you Harold Reynolds, Al Leiter, and Sean Casey. I guess their loyalties are to the media now. Ah, how soon they forget–who had ample opportunity but failed to ask Serena Roberts the hard questions.

    Like: who are the other 103 players; why are the sources that provided this info to Roberts and co. protected by anonymity, when this involves the tarnishing of a player’s reputation and stats, presumably forever; did these sources act legally in offering up this info; did they have an axe to grind; and why did the SI writers—who claim not to know the identity of the remaining 103—think it was fair to leak a six year-old report and single out A-Rod, for an infraction that wasn’t even deemed punishable by MLB at the time, but not look into the rest of the players listed? (Don’t worry: the cynic in me knows the answer to that last question lies in the ever-lasting quest to sell magazines.)

    Pitchers and catchers on Saturday. It’s gonna be a loooong season.

  95. Kevin in Missouri permalink
    February 10, 2009 6:47 am

    Give me a break!! He didn’t come clean. He got caught. Now he is trying to crawdad!! Don’t give the now known cheater a break!! Piss on him. If you wait until after the fact, you aren’t trying to come clean and help baseball, you are trying to get everyone off of your back. Don’t give this jackass a break. Hammer him. I don’t give a flip what he did, but I want to see his cheatin, lyin, no good ass drug through the mud.

  96. February 10, 2009 6:57 am

    A-Rod is not sorry. He did what all these high priced athletes do now when they get into trouble…hire a PR Firm to start spinning. A-Rod always denied his use until he couldn’t deny anymore. I truly believe the funniest statement going right now by Yankees fans is “Arod hasn’t done it since he tested positive in 2003” What sign by Arod would give you the impression that he didn’t constantly try and get an edge? It will be interesting to see his stats at the end of this year.

    BuzzCal.com
    “The Ultimate Sports Calendar”

  97. Joe D permalink
    February 10, 2009 8:28 am

    OK, OK here we go again. First the Mitchell report now the list that never was to be published gets published. I love this game, but everyone involved is making it very difficult to respect the game….
    Everyone involved is to blame. Players, coaches, trainers, owners, union officials and the Commissioner.
    WHY?
    Players – for taking DRUGS!!!!!!
    Coaches, trainers , owners – IGNORING THE PROBLEM !!!!!!!!!!!!! For the sake of success rather than the history of the game.
    UNION OFFICIALS – Greed!!!!!!!!!!
    The Commissioner – He is a Puppet for the owners he has NO BALLS…….
    IF I were the COMMISSONER….there would be no such thing as 3 strikes and you are out of baseball for drug use.
    Testing should be done every week….You get caught once and you are done, out of the game for life, lose your contract and get a real job. Case closed!!!!!! Look what happened to Pete Rose for gambling.
    The Union should pay for all the testing….and it should be mandatory…..
    MAKE ME THE COMMISSIONER I will clean up baseball in 2 months….either the players and union comply or they go on strike…..screw them if the choose strike. I will bring in replacements. SCABS as some people call them from all over the world. Japan, the Dominican and so on. …..but they would be tested prior to stepping on the field. These guys would KILL to get a shot at the bigs…..
    Don’t get me wrong I love this game. Some of my fondest memories are of listing to the Yankees on the radio with my Grandfather. He taught me the game and I still teach to this day…I just love and respect the game. IT IS AN HONOR TO BE A MAJOR LEAGE BALL PLAYER AND THESE GUYS HAVE FORGOTTEN THAT…..

    Beansy D.

  98. Matt F. permalink
    February 10, 2009 10:41 am

    Way to not respond to my comment about the 1993 Phillies! How many guys in your own locker room were using steroids that year? How could you, oh high and mighty Curt Schilling, look the other way back then?

  99. Mike Stewart permalink
    February 10, 2009 12:12 pm

    Curt,

    You are just another hypocrite in Major League baseball. You guys knew what players were taking steriods, Lenny Dykstra, Daulton….come on Curt. I am a former small college baseball player, 1990. We had 5 guys on our team taking steriods. The entire team knew. You are just as guilty as Alex. Guilty of sticking by some “code”, not coming forward. You were probably on roids before testing and knew you wouldn’t get caught. The guy who manned up was Jose Canseco. Why don’t you man up Curt.

  100. Dave S, permalink
    February 10, 2009 2:54 pm

    Initially I thought it was a good thing that Alex apologized; then I saw the interview with Peter Gammons and now think otherwise. First off, I don’t know that what we saw is the eitire interview and if there was any attempt to spin it one way or another via editing. That said, he says that one can get all sorts of things on the shelves of GNC. He didn’t get this stuff from GNC, now granted that’s not what he’s claiming he’s just saying that one can find lots of stuff at GNC. Heck, one can find lots of things at their local Stop & Shop too.

    I do not believe for a second that he came out out of the goodness of his heart; he had that chance when Katie Couric interviewed him. I also don’t believe that those were the only 3 years he used PED.

  101. Ken W permalink
    February 10, 2009 3:09 pm

    Regarding A Rod, His true colors were exhibited in 2 plays. 1. Slapping the ball out of Bronson Aroyo’s glove while running down the 1st base line and 2. Rounding the bases between 2nd and 3rd he yelled that he had an infield pop-up. The ball ended up dropping in between the infielders. Call these plays class-less, bush league or cheating but they speak volumes on his character. These actions were instinctive and reactive. His first instinct was to cheat. I would argue that this reflects his true character. Is anyone surprised that he cheated with banned drugs? Would anyone be surprised if he was still using HGH knowing that there are currently no tests available?

    The rest of the 103 names should be brought to the light of day. The best and quickest way to get beyond this is for the union, league, commissioner, and players to become transparent, honest, and forthcoming so that we can move on. The longer they resist, the greater the stain will be reflected in the games history. As fans we root for the name on the front of the jersey and not the one on the back. We, the fans, will get over it. If they are serious about returning the integrity to our sport the next CBA should include a mechanism to store samples for future testing. This will deter the usage of banned performance enhancing drugs that there are currently no tests for. (HGH). Hold the union’s feet to the fire and force them to choose between protecting cheaters and returning the games integrity.

    In return for this concession the league should install a commissioner that isn’t in the owners pocket and has respect for the history of the game. A few names that come to mind are Bob Costas, Peter Gammons, or maybe even George Mitchell (OK, I know he is kind of busy right now).

  102. Mark K permalink
    February 10, 2009 6:41 pm

    Curt,

    I disagree. A-Rod didn’t man up; he apologized. Big difference in my book.

    Don’t get me wrong, I am glad he apologized. It certainly would have gotten real ugly had he gone the Bonds and Clemens route.

    Manning up would have been admitting it when asked. But since that didn’t occur, it means several other things now:

    Manning up would be petitioning MLB to reduce his stats for his Texas years by half and returning his MVP.

    Manning up would be returning a minimum of half his salary back to Texas for his years there.

    Manning up would be forcing Scott Boras to have the Yankees re-work his contract to remove the bonus money should he pass Bond’s records.

    Manning up involves action.

    Manning up will be difficult, because it will mean putting his money where his mouth is.

    BTW, this is coming from a Yankees fan.

  103. Rick permalink
    February 10, 2009 6:43 pm

    I cant wait to see Schillings name on that list of 104 players who used steroids. Can this guy just shut up for one second? Did he get an endorsement deal from Heinz for putting ketchup in his sock??

  104. shawn permalink
    February 10, 2009 8:26 pm

    You just gotta love this sickening moral indignation that most will show when talking about people other than themselves. I guess it’s just not all that difficult to cast judgement on the mistakes of others so long as nobody is shining a flashlight in your closet in search of skeletons huh?

    I would be willing to wager that 8 outta 10 people in this thread have “cheated” at something in their lives…and didnt themselves “man up” or “come clean” until if/when they are confronted about their action either. Whether you have cheated on your taxes, or on your schoolwork back in college, or on your spouse or some girlfriend in your past when you were much younger, etc etc etc. There are a million and one ways to cheat, and I’m sure the majority of people here have tried at least one or two over the course of their lives.

    And I would be shocked if the many of you “fessed up” and admitted it until you abslutely had to.

    Does it make you a horrible person if you have done things in your past you are not proud of? Of course not.

    A-Rod is still a yankee in my book, but I give him credit for admitting what he did and dealing with it head-on…

  105. Matt F. permalink
    February 11, 2009 2:11 pm

    Still no talk about the 1993 Phillies from high and mighty Curt Schilling. Should you give back your World Series ring from 2007 because having Brendan Donnelly and Eric Gagne were on your team?

    What’s to talk about? What do you need me to tell you? Or want me to tell you? Why would I give back the ring from the 2007 World Series?

  106. Mark K permalink
    February 11, 2009 3:08 pm

    Curt,

    Are PED users thought a poorly of in the locker room as they are in the media and with fans?

    If not, why?

    If so, why has there not been one single player to come out and call the PED user(s) out?

    Is it the code of ‘what happens in the clubhouse stays in the clubhouse?’ Or is it that each player has some skeletons in the closest and is fearful of retribution?

    It would seem to me that while may active and retired players talk about the horrific state of game with its tarnished records, not one person (other than Jose Conseco) has come out and named names.

    There must not be too many players (former and active) who really do care and respect the game.

  107. Mark K permalink
    February 12, 2009 3:22 pm

    No comments on my questions Curt?

    Will honest answers black ball you?

  108. Matt F. permalink
    February 13, 2009 10:33 am

    You wrote last year that steroid users should give back their awards (i.e. Clemens and his Cy Young awards) …If he should give back his award because steroids helped him win, then shouldn’t you give back your World Series ring because steroid users helped you win it?

    Also, if steroids are ruining and have ruined baseball, why didn’t you call out your 1993 Phillies for using steroids? How many of them were on the juice or “funny vitamins”??

  109. Rick Neale permalink
    February 14, 2009 6:11 pm

    What I can’t quite grasp is the “I came clean after I was caught” mentality. The 5 potential cabinet members who were “caught” also came “clean”, it doesn’t wash anymore. Goverment, industry, sports, priests, etc all great remorse after the public is aware of their misdeeds.

    I am puzzled regarding the 104 playes who were tested. Privacy was the #1 bond on this issue and now ARod’s name comes out. Weren’t these tests done to find out the perctentage of players who were using? To reveal the other 103 names is saying that our word means nothing, trust is gone.

    Rick Neale

  110. robdog permalink
    February 18, 2009 10:08 am

    After the press conference yesterday, I don’t think he has fessed up. He claims that he did not know that he was taking a steroid because he was only 25. The other problem is that what he admits to does not explain the positive tests. Maybe MLB players and politicians aren’t so different, they lie and lie and only give parrtial truths when they get caught.

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Curt Schilling's Official Blog

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